Global Advanced Research Journal of Agricultural Science (GARJAS) ISSN: 2315-5094
December, 2015 Special Anniversary Review Issue.  Vol. 4(12): pp. 831-839
Copyright © 2015 Global Advanced Research Journals

 

Full Length Research Paper

Key concept of “Satoyama” on Sustainable Land Management -Case Study from Sabah, Malaysia-

Kazunobu Suzuki *1,2,Wong Tai Hock2, Roslan Mahali3, Elizabeth Malangkig3,Charles S Vairappan4,Nobuyuki Tsuji5 and Mitsuru Osaki6

 

1 Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University, Japan

2 JICA-SDBEC (Project on Sustainable Development for Biodiversity and Ecosystems Conservation, in Sabah)

3 Department of Agriculture, Kota Kinabalu Sabah, Malaysia

4 Institute Tropical Biology and Conservation, Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia

5 Center for Sustainability Science, Hokkaido University, Japan

6 Research Faculty of Agriculture, Hokkaido University, Japan

Email: suzuki.kazunobu0624@gmail.com

Accepted 07 December, 2015

 

Abstract

With the aim of presenting practical ways to maintain the ‘Satoyama System’, a case study was conducted in Sabah, Malaysia. Tudan village was selected as the case study site to show the traditional agricultural practices and conduct soil surveys. A series of semi-structured interviews with local farmers were conducted. As a result, it was found that swidden agriculture consisting of 12 stages has been traditionally practiced for several generations, and such agriculture practice had no negative impact on soil. Soil survey was also conducted to determine the soil types and their distribution for evaluating the soil crop suitability. Results indicate that Tudan had limited land for suitable agriculture due to steep slopes and shallow soils. Only about 27 percent of the total land was suitable for agricultural development, according to the Land use Criteria of Saba State. Finally, this paper discussed the Satoyama System which was a key concept for sustainable land management developed traditionally in Japan based on human-nature coexistence. It was concluded that Tudan village could have the potential to be a good model in terms of sustainable land management, and traditional agricultural practices at the village level might provide some thought-provoking ideas to strengthen the Satoyama System and expand it to other areas regionally and globally.

KeywordsSatoyama System, Asian Crescent, nature-human coexistence society, soil management, Tudan, Sabah.

 


 

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