Global Advanced Research Journal of Agricultural Science (GARJAS) ISSN: 2315-5094
September 2015 Vol. 4(9): pp. 474-478
Copyright © 2015 Global Advanced Research Journals

 

Full Length Research Paper

Contribution of Camel to the Meat Supply in Borno State, Nigeria

1Olusiyi, J., 1Lalabe, B.C.  2Danladi Y. 1Agbidie, Y. T

 

1Department of Animal Production and Health, Federal University Wukari.

2Department of Animal Science, Taraba State University Jalingo. Nigeria 

*Corresponding Author’s Email: niyisiyi@yahoo.com

Accepted 04 January, 2014

 

Abstract

A study was carried out to assess the contribution of camel to the meat supply in Borno State, Nigeria. Slaughter records from various abattoirs was collected in the ministry of Agriculture and Natural resources (MANR) Maiduguri from 1982 - 1991. Data collected for the study were analysed using descriptive statistics and statistical analysis (ANOVA)of total metric tonnes. The results indicated that a total of 373,417 Cattle; 608,199 Goats; 221,047 Sheep and 84,954 Camels were slaughtered in the State abattoirs within the period of ten years studied (1982 - 1991). The highest number of Cattle was slaughtered in 1982, with a total of 50,712, while the least was in 1986 with a total of 21,968. The highest number of goats was slaughtered in 1990 with a total of 82,570 while the least was slaughtered in 1983 with a total of 44,383. Also the highest number of sheep was slaughtered in 1990 with a total of 30,564; while the least was slaughtered in 1983 with a total of 5,151. The highest number of Camels was slaughtered in 1985 with a total of 19,284; while the least was in 1983 with a total of 3001. The total meat supply (Carcass Yield) of all the species of animal for the year under studied (1982 - 1991) was 107,948.3metric tonnes of meat. Out of this Cattle contributed 63,682.2 metric tonnes representing 62.21% of the total meat supply. The contribution of sheep was 5,526.20 metric tonnes representing 5.38% while the contribution of goats was 9,213.10 metric tonnes representing 8.97% of the total meat supply and Camels contributed 24,126.98 metric tonnes representing 23.52% to the total meat Supply.  Statistical analysis (ANOVA) for the total metric tonnes shows that cattle is highly significant with MEAN  SE = 579.436 + 15.399 (highest) followed by camels with 199.498 + 15.240. The tonnage contribution by goats and sheep are not different, and their meat are not distinguished by consumers. There was no significant difference between males and females slaughtered. The fact that slaughtered camels are statistically significant show its status as a meat animal in the semi-arid region. 

Keywords:  Meat, Camel, Cattle, Sheep, Goats and Slaughter.

 


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